Guides & Insight RSS

An Important Fuel Source  Carbohydrates are one of three main macronutrient groups found in foods. Despite often being falsely portrayed as the 'bad guy' to those looking to lose body weight, carbohydrates play a pivotal role in supplying energy to the working muscles! Let's strip it down to the basics. To maintain the contraction of skeletal muscles during exercise, active muscle cells require a constant supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Note that ATP is used to fuel all metabolic reactions, often referred to as the energy currency within cells. When ingested, carbohydrates (CHO) are broken down into glucose molecules. During...

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What Is Arm Pump? If you ride bikes, whether that’s motocross, enduro, MTB or road racing the likelihood is that you’ve experienced it! Arm pump is one of the most talked about exercise induced conditions associated with two wheeled action sports. But what actually is it and what is the root cause? Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) According to the literature, the underpinning condition resulting in the onset of ‘arm pump’ related symptoms is Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS). CECS is defined as an increase in intracompartmental pressure within the muscle fascia, resulting in reduced blood flow and tissue perfusion...

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Fluid Is Fluid Right? “As long as I’m drinking some kind of fluid I’m helping my body stay hydrated”. Unfortunately this is not the case! When in a hydrated state, the amount of fluid retained by the body thus helping to maintain hydration status over a period of time differs from drink to drink. Factors such as macronutrient content, electrolyte content and the presence of nutrients with diuretic actions are thought play a role in fluid retention. What Does The Research Say? Maughan et al. (2016) conducted a study investigating fluid balance responses to the ingestion of commonly consumed beverages...

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Why Calculate Sweat rates? Sweat rates are highly variable between athletes and can also vary for any given individual (due to changes in conditions, such as ambient temperature and humidity). As a result it is impossible to predict the exact amount of fluid to replace during exercise. However the following method will give you reasonably accurate data to then adopt a hydration plan that’s tailored to your body’s specific needs! What Equipment Will I Need? Accurate weighing scales A dry towel  What Are The Steps? Immediately before your exercise session weigh yourself naked (A). Complete your session (keep a note...

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Let's start with thermoregulation As humans we thermoregulate, this means our bodies are continually working to keep our core temperate within strict bounds. As many of you may know, the body’s resting core temperate is 37°C. During exercise we often see a rise in the body’s core temperature to between 38-40°C. How is the body able to lose heat during exercise? Radiation - Electromagnetic heat waves emitted. Convection - Heat loss through movement of air and water. Conduction - Transfer of heat between molecules. Evaporation - Evaporation of sweat. (Major method of heat loss).   The majority of heat being...

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